II. Processing and Prepping

The second section is Processing and Prepping and explores the industries that shaped a savory Seattle, from canneries to coffee roasters.

 Photo: MOHAI - 10,000 Salmon on cannery wharf and Chinese worker, ca. 1900

Photo: MOHAI - 10,000 Salmon on cannery wharf and Chinese worker, ca. 1900

In the salmon industry, people of different races held different jobs. White workers caught the fish and took care of the equipment while Chinese laborers sorted, butchered, and canned the fish. In this photo, a Chinese worker sorts salmon into various kinds and sizes. The photo was taken by Anders B. Wilse at a Puget Sound cannery wharf sometime around 1900.

 
 Photo: MOHAI - Coffee roasting at Crescent Manufacturing Company, Seattle, ca. 1927

Photo: MOHAI - Coffee roasting at Crescent Manufacturing Company, Seattle, ca. 1927

The Crescent Manufacturing Company factory in Seattle produced fresh roasted coffee as well as its many other products such as baking powder, extracts and spices. This photo shows coffee being dumped from the big gas roaster into a cooling pan. The clock-like mechanism on the left of the photo is an automatic temperature recorder.

Photographer: Anders B. Wilse, 1900

 MOHAI - Man hanging noodles on drying   rack at Mission   Macaroni   Co. ,  Seattle ,  January   1952

MOHAI - Man hanging noodles on drying rack at Mission Macaroni Co.SeattleJanuary 1952

Guido P. Merlino (1903-1991) founded the Mission Macaroni Mfg. Company during the economically challenging times of the Great Depression in 1932. Originally from Taranta Peligna, Italy, Merlino immigrated to the United States in 1920 at age 17, settling near his brother in Fresno, California. He later joined his cousins in Seattle as an owner of Pacific Coast Macaroni Co., producing "Three Monks" pasta at a factory on Rainier Avenue South. By 1932, Merlino had sold his interests in Pacific Coast and founded Mission. Eventually Mission would take over Seattle Macaroni in 1939 and Pacific Coast Macaroni three years later. Mission Macaroni was sold to San Francisco-based Golden Grain Macaroni Co. in 1956.

Photographer: Jim Huff, 1952

 Baker at Gai's Seattle French Baking Company, May 1981

Baker at Gai's Seattle French Baking Company, May 1981

Italian immigrant Giglio Gai opened New Home bakery at 20th Avenue South and South Jackson Street in 1931, selling French bread baked in a brick oven. The family business became Gai's Seattle French Baking in 1941, and was the top specialty bread baker in the state. After brothers Phil and Henry Gai took charge in the 1970s and 80s, Gai's diversified from supplying restaurants to baking buns for McDonald's, Burger King and other fast-food chains. Franz Bakery in Seattle acquired Gai's Seattle French Baking Company in 1996.

This photo shows baker Tom Larkin dropping oatmeal flakes onto bread dough at Gai's bakery.

Photographer: Benjamin Beschneidet, May 1981

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